Indoor Seed Starting

A few people have asked me about seed starting indoors and now is the time to do it.  My setup is quite large and allows me to have 32 seed flats under lights at one time. It’s composed of two stainless steel shelving units, 16 shop lights and 32 bulbs. Remember I have 10,000 square feet of vegetables, herbs and flowers to grow. I certainly didn’t buy all of this at one time either, instead I started with just a shelf and two shop lights and slowly grew it as the need arose. For your average small garden space of one or two hundred square feet, then a single shelf and two to four seed trays may be more than sufficient for vegetables, herbs and some extra flowers for the front yard.

My first year at gardening I quickly realized that purchasing plant starts can rapidly get out of hand, particularly if you kill your tomatoes like I did. I haven’t purchased a seedling since. The store’s vegetable starts are also frequently problematic with poor nutrition, chemical fertilizers, poisonous pesticide and fungicides, reduced or missing biological life and nearly always a poor root mass. Even the ones growing in those peat pots can struggle particularly if the biology isn’t functioning. Besides, growing from seed is far more satisfying and the variety of plants you can grow is exponentially more. And, if you’re like me and want high quality nutrient dense food a biologically dead soil isn’t going to do it for you. Additionally, depending upon how many starts you were going to buy, the cost of your indoor setup at least will pay for itself on your first year. My setup has probably paid for itself ten times over by now. As for the electric bill, it hardly budged, the lamp in your living room consumes more energy then a whole shop light.

lights

My lights are setup in a previously unused space in the basement were the temperatures are usually about 65 or 70 f. This is optimal germination temperature for just about all seeds. However, for seeds that need more warmth like peppers, tomatoes and celery, I use a seedling heating mat until they germinate, then remove the mat as the extra warmth is only needed to induce germination not plant growth. My wife would like me to find a couple of lemon trees so perhaps next winter I will buy a high powered grow light for the trees if I have enough money. Be aware that my description here is for standard fluorescent bulbs, not expensive high power grow lights that would burn your plants at the two inch distance I recommend here.

What about growing in the window sill? It certainly does work, but plant stress can significantly effect your outcome. At least in my area, most winter and spring weather means clouds more often than not and I don’t even have a suitable south facing window to use, or 32 of them, that isn’t at least partially obscured by trees. Outdoor greenhouse growing can work well too but you have to me much more careful about temperature swings, heating when its too cold and ventilation when its too hot.

lights2

Here is a detailed description of my setup. There are certainly many ways to accomplish this but I have had a lot of success with this one:

  1. Shelving. I use a stainless steel shelving unit picked up from a big box store. It’s four foot wide and deep enough that I can place four seed flats width-wise per shelf. It contains 5 total shelves, I use only the bottom four for the lights and the top for storage.
  2. Four foot long T5 shop light with a reflective back cover and holds at least two bulbs. One shop light is sufficient for two flats per shelf, but two shop lights will allow you to have four flats per shelf.
  3. Two s-hooks to hang each light from their short chains to the shelf above it. You can then easily adjust the height of the lights using the links of the chain.
  4. Two standard 32 W 5000K sunshine fluorescent bulbs for each shop light. I compared these to similar specially designed (marketed) grow lights and the only difference I could identify was these are 1/4 the cost.
  5. Electrical timer. I set this to run for 16 hours, turning on at 6:00 AM and off at 10:00 PM.
  6. Once your seed trays are in place, adjust the height of each light so it is about two inches above your plants. As the plants grow slowly raise the lights so they are always a little above them.

Now bask in the glow of your growing accomplishments.

~Sean

3 thoughts on “Indoor Seed Starting

  1. Fantastic! Easy enough. Thanks Sean. Paul and I just cleared a shy quarter acre of blackberries and are converting it to veggie garden space. This info will come in so handy. We’re hoping this will be our first 100% from seed year — it’s been quite an investment to get a full seed inventory built. (We’re shifting as much as possible to all OP/organic). Goal for to summer is to learn herb drying and seed collection techniques.

    • Hi Carla, I am happy to help and glad that you are finding this information helpful. If you got something in particular you are struggling with let me know and perhaps we can make another short article of it for you.

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